Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Booth, Alison L.
Nolen, Patrick J.
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 4026
Women and men may differ in their propensity to choose a risky outcome because of innate preferences or because their innate preferences are modified by pressure to conform to gender-stereotypes. Single-sex environments are likely to modify students' risk-taking preferences in economically important ways. To test this, our controlled experiment gave subjects an opportunity to choose a risky outcome - a real-stakes gamble with a higher expected monetary value than the alternative outcome with a certain payoff - and in which the sensitivity of observed risk choices to environmental factors could be explored. The results show that girls from single-sex schools are as likely to choose the real-stakes gamble as much as boys from either coed or single sex schools, and more likely than coed girls. Moreover, gender differences in preferences for risk-taking are sensitive to the gender mix of the experimental group, with girls being more likely to choose risky outcomes when assigned to all-girl groups. This suggests that observed gender differences in behaviour under uncertainty found in previous studies might reflect social learning rather than inherent gender traits.
Gender identity
controlled experiment
risk aversion
risk attitudes
single-sex schooling
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
363.57 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.