Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Rotte, Ralph
Steininger, Martin
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 3779
This paper investigates the consequences of immigration, crime and socio-economic depriviation for the performance of right-wing extremist and populist parties in the German city state of Hamburg between 1986 and 2005. The ecological determinants of voting for right-wing parties on the district level are compared to those for mainstream and other protest parties. Parallels and differences in spatial characteristics between right-wing extremist and populist parties' performance are identified. Our empirical results tend to confirm the general contextual sociological theory of right-wing radicalization by general social deprivation and immigration. Nevertheless they indicate that one has to be very cautious when interpreting the unemployment/crime - right-winger nexus. Moreover, crime does not seem to have a strong significant effect on right-wing populist parties' election successes despite its importance for their programmes and campaigns.
political extremism
labor market policy
welfare policy
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
876.45 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.