Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35529
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeinberg, Bruce A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-27en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:52:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:52:57Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-2009082174en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35529-
dc.description.abstractPeople use information about their ability to choose tasks. If more challenging tasks provide more accurate information about ability, people who care about and who are risk averse over their perception of their own ability will choose tasks that are not sufficiently challenging. Overestimation of ability raises utility by deluding people into believing that they are more able than they are in fact. Moderate overestimation of ability and overestimation of the precision of initial information leads people to choose tasks that raise expected output, however extreme overconfidence leads people to undertake tasks that are excessively challenging. Consistent with our results, psychologists have found that moderate overconfidence is both pervasive and advantageous and that people maintain such beliefs by underweighting new information about their ability.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x4285en_US
dc.subject.jelD03en_US
dc.subject.jelD08en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordOverconfidenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordbehavioral economicsen_US
dc.subject.keywordinformation processingen_US
dc.subject.stwBeschränkte Rationalitäten_US
dc.subject.stwVerhaltensökonomiken_US
dc.subject.stwInformationsverhaltenen_US
dc.subject.stwKognitionen_US
dc.subject.stwTheorieen_US
dc.titleA model of overconfidenceen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn608071749en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
139.31 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.