Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35448
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorvan Ommeren, Josen_US
dc.contributor.authorRusso, Giovannien_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-06en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:51:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:51:59Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20090304406en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35448-
dc.description.abstractIn the extensive job search literature, studies assume either sequential or non-sequential search. Which assumption is more reasonable? This paper introduces a novel method to test the hypothesis that firms search sequentially based on the relationship between the number of (rejected) job applicants and the number of employees hired. We use data compiled from filled vacancies for the Netherlands. Different types of search methods are distinguished. Our results imply that when firms use advertising, private or public employment agencies, which together cover about 45 percent of filled vacancies, sequential search is rejected. For about 55 percent of filled vacancies however, sequential search cannot be rejected. In line with theoretical considerations, when firms use search methods that rely on social networks, sequential search cannot be rejected.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA discussion papers |x4008en_US
dc.subject.jelJ63en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordSequential searchen_US
dc.subject.keywordrecruitmenten_US
dc.subject.stwPersonalbeschaffungen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsnachfrageen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsucheen_US
dc.subject.stwOffene Stellenen_US
dc.subject.stwNiederlandeen_US
dc.titleFirm recruitment behaviour: sequential or non-sequential search?en_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn593237331en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
635.88 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.