Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Lehrer, Evelyn Lilian
Lehrer, Vivian L.
Krauss, Ramona
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 4067
The Catholic Church has had a strong influence on the Chilean legal and social landscape in ways that have adversely affected victims of intimate partner violence; e.g., it succeeded until just five years ago in blocking efforts to legalize divorce. At the same time, quantitative studies based on survey data from the United States and other countries show a generally favorable influence of religion on health and many other domains of life, including intimate partner violence. The present study explores the puzzle posed by these seemingly opposing macro- and micro- level forces. Results based on data from the 2005 Survey of Student Well-Being, a questionnaire on gender based violence administered to students at a large public university in Chile, show that moderate or low levels of religiosity are associated with reduced vulnerability to violence, but high levels are not. This non-linearity sheds light on the puzzle, because at the macro level the religious views shaping Chile's legal and social environment have been extreme.
Intimate partner violence
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
238.89 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.