Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35423
Authors: 
Kose, M. Ayhan
Prasad, Eswar S.
Taylor, Ashley D.
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 4133
Abstract: 
The financial crisis has re-ignited the fierce debate about the merits of financial globalization and its implications for growth, especially for developing countries. The empirical literature has not been able to conclusively establish the presumed growth benefits of financial integration. Indeed, a new literature proposes that the indirect benefits of financial integration may be more important than the traditional financing channel emphasized in previous analyses. A major complication, however, is that there seem to be certain threshold levels of financial and institutional development that an economy needs to attain before it can derive the indirect benefits and reduce the risks of financial openness. In this paper, we develop a unified empirical framework for characterizing such threshold conditions. We find that there are clearly identifiable thresholds in variables such as financial depth and institutional quality - the cost-benefit trade-off from financial openness improves significantly once these threshold conditions are satisfied. We also find that the thresholds are lower for foreign direct investment and portfolio equity liabilities compared to those for debt liabilities.
Subjects: 
Financial openness
capital account liberalization
growth
threshold conditions
financial development
institutions
macroeconomic policies
JEL: 
F3
F4
O4
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
643.45 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.