Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Borghans, Lex
ter Weel, Bas
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA discussion papers 3792
We review the empirical literature about the implications of the computerization of the labor market to see whether it can explain observed computer adoption patterns and (long-term) changes in the wage structure. Evidence from empirical micro studies turns out to be inconsistent with macro studies that are based on CES production functions. We propose a micro foundation for the CES production function that allows for changes in the underlying structure. We adapt the macro model by incorporating computer skills, complementary skills and fixed costs for computer technology usage suggested by the micro literature. It turns out that fixed costs for computer technology usage explain different patterns of computer adoption and diffusion between several types of workers and countries; it also provides very plausible patterns of the timing of wage inequality and developments over time.
Wage level of structure
computer technology
technology diffusion
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
278.06 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.