Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/35282
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDammert, Ana C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-24en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:35:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:35:44Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20080828135en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/35282-
dc.description.abstractIn the last decade, the most popular policy tool used to increase human capital in developing countries has been the conditional cash transfer program. A large literature has shown significant mean impacts on schooling, health, and child labor. This paper examines heterogeneous effects using random-assignment data from the Red de Proteccion Social in rural Nicaragua. Using interactions between the targeting criteria and the treatment indicator, estimates suggest that children located in more impoverished localities experienced a larger impact of the program on schooling in 2001, but this finding is reversed in 2002. Estimated quantile treatment effects indicate that there is considerable heterogeneity in the impacts of the program on the distribution of food expenditures, as well as total expenditures. In particular, households at the lower end of the expenditure distribution experienced a smaller increase in expenditures. This paper also presents evidence of the rank invariance assumption to help clarify the interpretation of the quantile treatment effect in the development literature context.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x3653en_US
dc.subject.jelO15en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordNicaraguaen_US
dc.subject.keywordconditional cash transfersen_US
dc.subject.keywordquantile treatment effecten_US
dc.subject.stwSozialhilfeen_US
dc.subject.stwKonditionenen_US
dc.subject.stwKinderen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsverhaltenen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungspolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwWirkungsanalyseen_US
dc.subject.stwVerbraucherausgabenen_US
dc.subject.stwNicaraguaen_US
dc.titleHeterogeneous impacts of conditional cash transfers: evidence from Nicaraguaen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn578090562en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
428.68 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.