Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Neumann, Einat
Neuman, Shoshana
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3238
A Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) in the health-care sector is used to test the loss aversion theory that is derived from reference-dependent preferences: The absolute subjective value of a deviation from a reference point is generally greater when the deviation represents a loss than when the same-sized change is perceived as a gain. As far as is known, this paper is the first to use a DCE to test the loss aversion theory. A DCE appears to be a highly suitable tool for this testing because it estimates the marginal valuations of attributes, based on deviations from a reference point (a constant scenario). Moreover, loss aversion can be examined for each attribute separately. A DCE can also be applied to non-traded goods with non-tangible attributes. A health-care event is used for empirical illustration: The loss aversion theory is tested within the context of preference structures for maternity-ward attributes, estimated using data entailing 3850 observations from a sample of 542 women who recently gave birth. Seven hypotheses are presented and tested. Overall, significant support for behavioral loss aversion theories was found.
loss aversion
discrete choice experiment
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
248.55 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.