Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34954
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBlau, Francine D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKahn, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Albert Yung-Hsuen_US
dc.contributor.authorPapps, Kerry L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-13en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T11:31:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-07T11:31:02Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20081014377en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/34954-
dc.description.abstractUsing 1995 - 2006 Current Population Survey and 1970 - 2000 Census data, we study the intergenerational transmission of fertility, human capital and work orientation of immigrants to their US-born children. We find that second-generation women's fertility and labor supply are significantly positively affected by the immigrant generation's fertility and labor supply respectively, with the effect of mother's fertility and labor supply larger than that of women from the father's source country. The second generation's education levels are also significantly positively affected by that of their parents, with a stronger effect of father's than mother's education. Second-generation women's schooling levels are negatively affected by immigrant fertility, suggesting a quality-quantity tradeoff for immigrant families. We find higher transmission rates for immigrant fertility to the second generation than we do for labor supply or education: after one generation, 40-65% of any immigrant excess fertility will remain, but only 12-18% of any immigrant annual hours shortfall and 18-36% of any immigrant educational shortfall. These results suggest a considerable amount of assimilation across generations toward native levels of schooling and labor supply, although fertility effects show more persistence.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA discussion papers |x3732en_US
dc.subject.jelD10en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordImmigrationen_US
dc.subject.keywordsecond generationen_US
dc.subject.keywordgenderen_US
dc.subject.keywordlabor supplyen_US
dc.subject.keywordfertilityen_US
dc.subject.keywordhuman capitalen_US
dc.subject.stwMigrantenen_US
dc.subject.stwEinwanderungen_US
dc.subject.stwMänneren_US
dc.subject.stwFrauenen_US
dc.subject.stwGeburtenrateen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsinvestitionen_US
dc.subject.stwErwerbstätigkeiten_US
dc.subject.stwGenerationenbeziehungenen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleThe transmission of women's fertility, human capital and work orientation across immigrant generationsen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn581743946en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
318.09 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.