Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Blundell, Richard W.
Brewer, Mike
Francesconi, Marco
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3044
This paper uses British panel data to investigate single women’s labour supply changes in response to three tax and benefit policy reforms that occurred in the 1990s. These reforms changed individuals' work incentives and we use them to identify changes in labour supply. We find evidence of small hours of work effects for two of such reforms. A third reform in 1999 instead led to a significant increase in single mothers' hours of work. The mechanism by which the labour supply adjustments were made occurred largely through job changes rather than hours changes with the same employer. These results are confirmed when we look at hours changes by stated labour supply preferences. Finally, we find little overall effect of the reforms on wages.
job mobility
hours flexibility
labour supply preferences
hours-wage trade-off
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
308.29 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.