Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Tan, Hong
Savchenko, Yevgeniya
Gimpelson, Vladimir
Kapelyushnikov, Rostislav
Lukyanova, Anna
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2751
In the transition to a market economy, the Russian workforce underwent a wrenching period of change, with excess supply of some industrial skills coexisting with reports of skill shortages by many enterprises. This paper uses data from the Russia Competitiveness and Investment Climate Survey and related local research to gain insights into the changing supply and demand for skills over time, and the potential reasons for reported staffing problems and skill shortages, including labor turnover, compensation policies and the inhibiting effects of labor regulations. It discusses in-service training as an enterprise strategy for meeting staffing and skill needs, and presents evidence on the distribution, intensity and determinants of in-service training in Russia. It investigates the productivity and wages outcomes of in-service training, and the supportive role of training in firms' research and development (R&D) and innovative activities. A final section concludes with some policy implications of the findings.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
787.68 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.