Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34439
Authors: 
Georgarakos, Dimitris
Tatsiramos, Konstantinos
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2792
Abstract: 
Many studies have explored the determinants of entering into entrepreneurship and the differences in self-employment rates across racial and ethnic groups. However, very little is known about the survival in entrepreneurship of immigrants to the U.S. and their descendants. Employing data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we find a lower survival probability in entrepreneurship for Mexican and other Hispanic immigrants, which does not carry on to their U.S.-born descendants. We also find that these two immigrant groups tend to enter entrepreneurship from unemployment or inactivity and they are more likely to exit towards employment in the wage sector, suggesting that entrepreneurship represents for them an intermediate step from non-employment to paid employment.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
281.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.