Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34365
Authors: 
Kahanec, Martin
Mendola, Mariapia
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 3146
Abstract: 
The labor market outcomes of ethnic minorities in advanced societies and their dependence on social relationships and membership in social networks are important empirical issues with significant policy consequences. We use detailed micro-data on multiple-origin ethnic minorities in England and Wales and a discrete choice model to investigate these issues. We find that the core family structure and contacts with parents and children away (in Britain) increases the probability of self-employment. On the other hand, engagement in organizational social networks is more likely to channel the same people into paid employment. Finally, disaggregating different types of social networks along their compositional characteristics, we find that having ethnic friends is positively associated with the likelihood to be self-employed while integration in mixed or non-ethnic social networks facilitates paid employment among minority individuals. These findings hint at a positive role of social integration on employment opportunities of ethnic communities in host societies.
Subjects: 
Labor market
self-employment
ethnic minorities
social ties
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
521.08 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.