Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34200
Authors: 
Meng, Xin
Gregory, Robert George
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2548
Abstract: 
During the Chinese Cultural Revolution many schools stopped normal operation for a long time, senior high schools stopped student recruitment for up to 6 years, and universities stopped recruitment for an even longer period. Such large scale school interruptions significantly reduced the opportunity for a large cohort of individuals to obtain university degrees and senior high school qualifications. More than half of this cohort who would normally attain a university degree were unable to do so. We estimate that those who did not obtain a university degree, because of the Cultural Revolution, lost an average of more than 50 percent of potential earnings. Both genders suffered reduced attainment of senior high school certificates and more than 20 per cent prematurely stopped their education process at junior high school level. However, these education responses do not appear to have translated into lower earnings. In addition, at each level of education attainment most of the cohort experienced missed or interrupted schooling. We show, however, that given the education certificate attained, the impact on earnings of these missed years of schooling or lack of normal curricula was small
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
484.39 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.