Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/34077
Authors: 
Rablen, Matthew D.
Oswald, Andrew J.
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2560
Abstract: 
It has been known for centuries that the rich and famous have longer lives than the poor and ordinary. Causality, however, remains trenchantly debated. The ideal experiment would be one in which status and money could somehow be dropped upon a sub-sample of individuals while those in a control group received neither. This paper attempts to formulate a test in that spirit. It collects 19th-century birth data on science Nobel Prize winners and nominees. Using a variety of corrections for potential biases, the paper concludes that winning the Nobel Prize, rather than merely being nominated, is associated with between 1 and 2 years of extra longevity. Greater wealth, as measured by the real value of the Prize, does not seem to affect lifespan.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
284.16 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.