Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/33972
Authors: 
Martins, Pedro Silva
Walker, Ian
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2490
Abstract: 
We examine the empirical determinants of student achievement in higher education, focusing our attention on its small-group teaching component (classes or seminars) and on the role of attendance, number of students per class, peers, and tutors. The empirical analysis is based on longitudinal administrative data from a major undergraduate program where students are allocated to class groups in a systematic way, but one which is plausibly uncorrelated with ability. Although, in simple specifications, we find positive returns to attendance and sizeable differences in the effectiveness of teaching assistants, most effects are not significant in specifications that include student fixed effects. We conclude that unobserved heterogeneity amongst students, even in an institution that imposes rigorous admission criteria and so has little observable heterogeneity, is apparently much more important than observable variation in inputs in explaining student outcomes.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
259.76 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.