Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/33829
Authors: 
Gørgens, Tue
Meng, Xin
Vaithianathan, Rhema
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 2543
Abstract: 
The Great Chinese Famine of 1959-1961 is puzzling, since despite the high death rates, there is no discernable diminution in height amongst the majority of cohorts who were exposed to the famine in crucial growth years. An explanation is that shorter children experienced greater mortality and that this selection offset stunting. We disentangle stunting and selection effects of the Chinese famine, using the height of the children of the famine cohort. We find significant stunting of about 2cm for rural females and slightly less for rural males who experienced the famine in the first five years of life. Our results suggest that mortality bias implies that raw height is not always a good measure of economic conditions during childhood
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
302.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.