Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/33605
Authors: 
Chojnicki, Xavier
Docquier, Frédéric
Ragot, Lionel
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 1676
Abstract: 
This paper examines the economic impact of the second great immigration wave (1945-2000) on the US economy. Contrary to recent studies, we estimate that immigration induced important net gains and small redistributive effects among natives. Our analysis relies on a computable general equilibrium model combining the major interactions between immigrants and natives (labor market impact, fiscal impact, capital deepening, endogenous education, endogenous inequality). We use a backsolving method to calibrate the model on historical data and then consider two counterfactual variants: a cutoff of all immigration flows since 1950 and a stronger selection policy. According to our simulations, the postwar US immigration is beneficial for all cohorts and all skill groups. These gains are closely related to a long-run fiscal gain and a small labor market impact of immigrants. Finally, we also demonstrate that all generations would have benefited from a stronger selection of immigrants.
Subjects: 
immigration
inequality
welfare
computable general equilibrium
JEL: 
J61
I3
D58
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
306.24 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.