Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAmuedo-Dorantes, Catalinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorde la Rica, Saraen_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents new evidence on the role of gender segregation within industry, occupation, establishment, and occupation-establishment cells in explaining gender wage differentials of full-time salaried workers in Spain during 1995 and 2002. Using data from the Spanish Wage Structure Surveys, we find that the raw gender wage gap decreased from 0.26 to 0.22 over the course of seven years. However, even after accounting for workers' human capital, job characteristics, and female segregation into lower-paying industries, occupations, establishments, and occupations within establishments, women still earned approximately 13 percent and 16 percent less than similar male counterparts as of 1995 and 2002, respectively. Most of the gender wage gap is attributable to workers' sex. Yet, female segregation into lower-paying occupations within establishments, establishments and industries accounted for a sizable and growing fraction of the female-male wage differential.en_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x1742en_US
dc.subject.keywordgender wage differentialsen_US
dc.subject.keywordfemale segregationen_US
dc.subject.keywordmatched employer-employee dataen_US
dc.titleThe impact of gender segregation on male-female wage differentials: evidence from matched employer-employee data for Spainen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US

Files in This Item:
266.92 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.