Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeitmüller, Axelen_US
dc.contributor.authorMichaud, Pierre-Carlen_US
dc.description.abstractMore than 40% of the respondents in the British Household Panel Survey provide informal care at least for one year within the period 1991-2003 and carers are usually less likely to hold simultaneously a paid job. There is little evidence on the mechanism that links informal care provision and labour market outcomes. This paper provides evidence on the pathways through which this pattern arises using a multivariate dynamic panel data model that accounts for state-dependence, feedback effects and correlated unobserved heterogeneity. We find evidence of a causal link from informal care to employment with employment rates reduced by up to 6 percentage points. However, this effect is only found for co-residential carers who account for one third of the population of carers and less than 5 percent of the overall labor force. For the same group, a significantly smaller link from employment to care provision is found. A micro-simulation exercise using the model estimates suggest that the overall potential pressure on the provision of informal care created by a rise in the employment rate is minimal.en_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIZA Discussion Papers |x2010en_US
dc.subject.keywordinformal careen_US
dc.subject.keywordemployment dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.keyworddynamic panel data modelsen_US
dc.titleInformal care and employment in England: evidence from the British household panel surveyen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US

Files in This Item:
395.84 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.