Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/32224
Authors: 
Broadberry, Stephen
Burhop, Carsten
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Preprints of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009,18
Abstract: 
Throughout the period 1871-1938, the average British worker was better off than the average German worker, but there were significant differences between major sectors. For the aggregate economy, the real wage gap was about the same as the labour productivity gap, but again there were important sectoral differences. Compared to their productivity, German industrial workers were poorly paid, whereas German agricultural and service sector employees were overpaid. This affected the competitiveness of the two countries in these sectors. There were also impor-tant differences in comparative real wages by skill level, affecting the extent of poverty.
Subjects: 
Economic history
Britain
Germany
Real wages
JEL: 
N13
N33
E24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
692.59 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.