Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorErtürk, Korkut A.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe sharp exchanges that Keynes had with some of his critics on the loanable funds theory made it harder to appreciate the degree to which his thought was continuous with the tradition of monetary analysis that emanates from Wicksell, of which Keynes's A Treatise on Money was a part. In the aftermath of the General Theory (GT), many of Keynes's insights in the Treatise were lost or abandoned because they no longer fit easily in the truncated theoretical structure he adopted in his latter work. A part of Keynes's analysis in the Treatise which emphasized the importance of financial conditions and asset prices in determining firms' investment decisions was later revived by Minsky, but another part, about the way self-sustained biases in asset price expectations in financial markets exerted their influence over the business cycle, was mainly forgotten. This paper highlights Keynes's early insights on asset price speculation and its link to monetary circulation, at the risk perhaps, of downplaying the importance of the GT.en_US
dc.publisher|aLevy Economics Institute of Bard College |cAnnandale-on-Hudson, NYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aWorking papers // The Levy Economics Institute |x435en_US
dc.subject.keywordKeynesian Monetary Theoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordLiquidity Preferenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordAsset Price Speculationen_US
dc.titleSpeculation, liquidity preference, and monetary circulationen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US

Files in This Item:
624.51 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.