Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/3133
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLanghammer, Rolf J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T14:35:09Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T14:35:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/3133-
dc.description.abstractThe paper analyses the interests of China as a member of the G-21,which contributed to the failure of the WTO Ministerial Conference inCancún/Mexico in September 2003. It concludes that the medianmember of G-21 is more inward-looking and less reform-minded thanChina. A failure of the Doha Round due to a North-South divide betweenthe US/EU on the one hand and the G-21 on the other hand would causemore harm to the latter than to the former group and would also impactnegatively upon China, which has fewer alternatives to a multilateralround than both most of the other G-21 members and the two bigplayers. Thus, China would be well-advised to remain unconstrained inits trade policies and does not become member of any group.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aKiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW) |cKielen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aKiel Working Paper |x1194en_US
dc.subject.jelF0en_US
dc.subject.jelF1en_US
dc.subject.ddc330-
dc.subject.keywordMultilateral trade policies , trade liberalisation , world trading orderen_US
dc.subject.stwAußenwirtschaftspolitiken_US
dc.subject.stwChinaen_US
dc.titleChina and the G-21: a new North-South divide in the WTO after Cancún?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn378092480en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:1194-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
202.83 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.