Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Campbell, Colin M.
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Working papers // Department of Economics, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey 2005,12
A standard election in which each voter chooses a single alternative permits voters little scope to express the intensity of their preferences. Allowing more complex statements of preferences may not alleviate the problem if voters behave strategically, as only certain statements are credible. I consider the implications of allowing voters to burn money as part of the voting procedure. In an environment with two alternatives and voters with interdependent values, I find necessary and sufficient conditions for all choice functions that are minimally responsive to voter preferences to be implementable with money burning. Furthermore, I show that any choice rule that treats exante identical voters symmetrically can be implemented with an arbitrarily small amount of money burnt per voter as the set of voters is replicated. Thus, for a large electorate, the informational gains of money burning can be reaped at virtually no social cost.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
202.19 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.