Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/30617
Authors: 
Cinnirella, Francesco
Winter, Joachim
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 2733
Abstract: 
Taller workers earn on average higher salaries. Recent research has proposed cognitive abilities and social skills as explanations for the height-wage premium. Another possible mechanism, employer discrimination, has found little support. In this paper, we provide some evidence in favor of the discrimination hypothesis. Using a cross section of 13 countries, we show that there is a consistent height-wage premium across Europe and that it is largely due to occupational sorting. We show that height has a significant effect for the occupational sorting of employed workers but not for the self-employed. We interpret this result as evidence of employer discrimination in favor of taller workers. Our results are consistent with the theoretical predictions of recent models on statistical discrimination and employer learning.
Subjects: 
height
wage premium
discrimination
cognitive functions
occupational sorting
JEL: 
J24
J31
J71
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.