Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/30502
Authors: 
Gronwald, Marc
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 2702
Abstract: 
This paper is concerned with the apparent change in the U.S. oil price-macroeconomy relationship. It is investigated to what extent this change can be accounted for by the large oil price surges witnessed in the 1970s. The innovative approach of rolling impulse responses is applied and both the aggregate and the industry-level is considered. It is found that the first oil crisis has an persistent” effect in the sense that this incident still dominates long-run results and superimposes both subsample and industry-specifics. The results, furthermore, suggest that the Great Moderation can essentially be explained by the non-occurrence of large oil shocks after the mid 1980s and that oil is less important for the economy than many researchers still believe.
Subjects: 
oil price
vector autoregressions
rolling impulse responses
Great Moderation
JEL: 
C32
C63
E32
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.