Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/28185
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBraakmann, Nilsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-20en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-01T15:02:05Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-01T15:02:05Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/28185-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines whether the labor market prospects of Arab men in England are influenced by recent Islamistic terrorist attacks and the war on Iraq. We use data from the British Labour Force Survey from Spring 2001 to Winter 2006 and treat the terrorist attacks on the USA on September 11th, 2001, the Madrid train bombings on March 11th, 2004 and the London bombings on July 7th, 2005, as well as the beginning of the war on Iraq on March 20th, 2003, as natural experiments possibly having led to a change in attitudes toward Arab or Muslim men. Using treatment group definitions based on ethnicity, country of birth, current nationality, and religion, evidence from regression-adjusted di_erence-in-di_erences-estimators indicates that the real wages, hours worked and employment probabilities of Arab men were unchanged by the attacks. This finding is in line with prior evidence from Europe.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aLeuphana-Univ.|cLüneburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aUniversity of Lüneburg working paper series in economics|x70en_US
dc.subject.jelJ71en_US
dc.subject.jelJ79en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleIslamistic terror, the war on Iraq and the job prospects of Arab men in Britain: does a country's direct involvement matter?en_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn55559064Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
634.85 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.