Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/28101
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKnabe, Andreasen_US
dc.contributor.authorRätzel, Steffenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-15en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-25T13:29:10Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-25T13:29:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-941240-06-3en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/28101-
dc.description.abstractWe reexamine the claim that the effect of income on subjective well-being suffers from a systematic downward bias if one ignores that higher income is typically associated with more work effort. We analyze this claim using German panel data, controlling for individual unobserved heterogeneity, and specifying the impact of working hours in a non-monotonic form. Our results suggest that the impact of working hours on happiness is rather small and exhibits an inverse U-shape. We do not find evidence that leaving working hours out of the analysis leads to an underestimation of the income effect.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aFreie Univ., Fachbereich Wirtschaftswiss.|cBerlinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aSchool of Business & Economics Discussion Paper|x2009/12en_US
dc.subject.jelD60en_US
dc.subject.jelI31en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordHappinessen_US
dc.subject.keywordlife satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.keywordincomeen_US
dc.subject.keyworddisutility of laboren_US
dc.titleIncome, happiness, and the disutility of laboren_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn608759643en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:fubsbe:200912-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
116.53 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.