Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/26670
Authors: 
Li, Yao
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working paper 2625
Abstract: 
This paper uses a gravity framework to investigate the effects of distance as well as subnational and national borders in knowledge spillovers. Drawing on the NBER Patent Citations Database, we examine patent citations data at metropolitan level within the U.S. and the 38 largest patent-cited countries outside the U.S. We present 3 key findings: First, we find strong subnational localization effects at the Metropolitan Statistical Area and state levels: more than 90% of intranational border effects stem from the metropolitan level rather than state. Second, border and distance effects decrease with the age of cited patent, which implies that new knowledge faces the largest barriers to diffusion. However, over time, border and distance effects are interestingly increasing. Finally, we find that (assignee) self-citations and aggregation bias are two sources of overestimated aggregate border effects of knowledge spillovers. While self-citations are only 11% of total citations, they account for approximately 50% of MSA and national border effects.
Subjects: 
knowledge spillovers
gravity
border effect
distance
patent citations
JEL: 
F10
F29
O30
O33
O34
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
821.01 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.