Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/266360
Authors: 
Roberts Lyer, Kirsten
Saliba, Ilyas
Spannagel, Janika
Year of Publication: 
2023
Citation: 
[Editor:] Roberts Lyer, Kirsten [Editor:] Saliba, Ilyas [Editor:] Spannagel, Janika [Title:] University Autonomy Decline: Causes, Responses, and Implications for Academic Freedom [ISBN:] 978-1-0033-0648-1 [Series:] Routledge Research in Higher Education [Publisher:] Routledge [Place:] London [Year:] 2023 [Pages:] 177-193
Publisher: 
Routledge, London
Abstract: 
This chapter sets out three central hypotheses on decline in university autonomy, with illustrative examples from eight qualitative case studies (Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, India, Mozambique, Poland, Russia, and Turkey) and the Academic Freedom Index data (AFI). The three hypotheses are the following: First, that a major decline in university autonomy is typically coupled with a broader decline in democracy and the rule of law in a country. Second, that excessive government interference with university autonomy focuses on governance, particularly on who leads the institution, or can manifest in excessive state regulation. Third, attacking university autonomy is an effective way to undermine academic freedom, but not the only way, and there is no typical sequence in the kinds of attacks that target academic freedom.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Additional Information: 
The publication of the open access book "University Autonomy Decline: Causes, Responses, and Implications for Academic Freedom" was funded by the Open Societies Foundation and the Open Access Publishing Fund of the Leibniz Association.
Creative Commons License: 
cc-by-nc-nd Logo
Document Type: 
Book Part
Document Version: 
Published Version

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.