Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/26589
Authors: 
Hoffmann, Mathias
Shcherbakova, Iryna
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working paper 2544
Abstract: 
Consumption risk sharing among U.S. federal states increases in booms and decreases in recessions. We find that small firms' access to credit markets plays an important role in explaining this stylized fact: business cycle fluctuations in aggregate risk sharing are more pronounced in states in which small firms account for a large share income or employment. In addition, better access of small firms to credit markets in the wake of state-level banking deregulation during the 1980s seems to have loosened the dependence of aggregate risk sharing on the business cycle. Not only do our result support that better access to credit markets may have made it easier for the owners of small firms to smooth income in the face of adverse cash-flows shocks to their business. They suggest a major additional benefit from banking deregulation: access to bank credit has become more reliable and is more easily available when households and firms need it most urgently - in economic downturns.
Subjects: 
Interstate risk sharing
regional business cycle
proprietary income
small businesses
state banking deregulation
JEL: 
E32
E44
F3
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
347.89 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.