Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/26124
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarson, Scott Alanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-02en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-28T08:16:13Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-28T08:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/26124-
dc.description.abstractModern labor studies consider the relationship between wages and biological markers. A relevant historical question is the relationship between occupational status and biological markers. This study demonstrates that 19th century stature and BMIs were significant in Texas occupation selection; however, stature and BMIs were not significant in the decision to participate in the Southwest's labor market. In the post-bellum south, labor markets were segregated, and white laborers were at a distinct occupational and social advantage relative to their black counterparts. It is documented here that the probability of being farmers and unskilled workers were comparable by race. However, whites had greater access to white-collar and skilled occupations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aCenter for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute (CESifo) |cMunichen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aCESifo working paper|x2079en_US
dc.subject.jelJ15en_US
dc.subject.jelJ24en_US
dc.subject.jelJ70en_US
dc.subject.jelN31en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwErwerbsstatusen_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheiten_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsmarktdiskriminierungen_US
dc.subject.stwEthnische Diskriminierungen_US
dc.subject.stwFarbige Bevölkerungen_US
dc.subject.stwUSA (Südstaaten)en_US
dc.titleBlack and white labor market outcomes in the 19th century American Southen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn555916863en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
182.33 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.