Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/260021
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper No. 2011:32
Publisher: 
Lund University, School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Lund
Abstract: 
This paper contributes to the scant empirical literature on the effects of emigration on source countries' labour markets. Using a novel dataset by Brücker et al. (2009), we investigate whether emigration from the Central and Eastern European (CEE) members of European Union (EU) during the period 2000 to 2007 has contributed to the decline in unemployment observed in these countries. We find that along with structural changes that occurred in the CEE economies during the last decade, emigration indeed had a strong negative effect on unemployment in these countries. A 10 per cent increase in emigration rate leads to around 5 per cent decrease in unemployment rate. Given the minor effect of immigration on host countries' unemployment found in the literature (including the studies examining the East-West European migration), this paper's results indicate that the opening up of labour markets following the enlargement of EU in 2004 mainly has had positive effects.
Subjects: 
emigration
unemployment
Central and Eastern Europe
JEL: 
J21
J31
J61
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
109.57 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.