Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/25924
Authors: 
Carson, Scott Alan
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo working paper 1879
Abstract: 
Recent modern life expectancy improvements rely heavily on medical intervention; however, before the mid-20th century, increased longevity was primarily the result of improved nutrition and less virulent disease environments. Moreover, 19th century health conditions varied by race, especially in the American South. The body mass index (BMI) reflects health conditions, and male BMIs in Texas State Prison reflected diseases associated with low BMI diseases, i.e., respiratory and infectious diseases, and tuberculosis. When able to work, Southern African-Americans in the 19th century acquired heavier BMIs during prime working ages; however, when they were no longer productive and exited the labor force, their BMIs declined, and older black males became more vulnerable to low BMI diseases.
JEL: 
I10
I32
J15
N11
N30
N37
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
181.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.