Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/25814
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBosker, E. Maartenen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarretsen, Harryen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-06en_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-28T08:12:28Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-28T08:12:28Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/25814-
dc.description.abstractTo explain cross-country income differences, research has recently focused on the so-called deep determinants of economic development, notably institutions and geography. This paper sheds a different light on these determinants. We use spatial econometrics to analyse the importance of the geography of institutions. We show that it is not only absolute geography, in terms of for instance climate, but also relative geography, the spatial linkages between countries, that matters for a country's gdp per capita. Apart from a country's own institutions, institutions in neighboring countries turn out to be relevant as well. This finding is robust to various alternative specifications.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aCenter for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute (CESifo) |cMunichen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aCESifo working paper|x1769en_US
dc.subject.jelO11en_US
dc.subject.jelF43en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleGeography rules too!: Economic development and the geography of institutionsen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn517024519en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.71 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.