Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAmegashie, J. Atsuen_US
dc.description.abstractIn psychological games, higher-order beliefs, emotions, and motives - in addition to actions - affect players' payoffs. Suppose you are tolerated as opposed to being genuinely accepted by your peers and friends . In particular, suppose you are invited to a party, movie, dinner, etc not because your company is desired but because the inviter would feel guilty if she did not invite you. In all of these cases, it is conceivable that the intention behind the action will matter and hence will affect your payoffs. I model intentions in a dynamic psychological game under incomplete information. I find a complex social interaction in this game. In particular, a player may stick to a strategy of accepting every invitation with the goal of discouraging insincere invitations. This may lead one to erroneously infer that this player is eagerly waiting for an invitation, when indeed his behavior is driven more by strategic considerations than by an excessive desire for social acceptance. I discuss how being tolerated but not being truly accepted can explain the rejection of mutually beneficial trades, the choice of identity, social exclusion, marital divorce, and its implication for political correctness and affirmative action.en_US
dc.publisher|aCenter for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute (CESifo) |cMunichen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aCESifo working paper|x1757en_US
dc.titleIntentions and social interactionsen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US

Files in This Item:
206.67 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.