Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/253736
Authors: 
Alfani, Guido
Ammannati, Francesco
Ryckbosch, Wouter
Year of Publication: 
2022
Series/Report no.: 
EHES Working Paper No. 222
Publisher: 
European Historical Economics Society (EHES), s.l.
Abstract: 
Earlier research on poverty failed to provide us with consistent measures of its prevalence across space and time. This is due to the limitations of the available sources and to the difficulty of applying to them the poverty definitions of modern social science. This article discusses different possible approaches to poverty measurement and the problems encountered when applying them to historical sources. Thereafter it proposes a way to measure absolute and, more importantly, relative poverty which makes good use of the information made available by recent research on inequality. We detect a long-run tendency towards an increase in the prevalence of poverty, both in the South and in the North of Europe. This trend was only temporarily interrupted by large-scale plague and other catastrophes, although the Black Death had stronger and more persistent poverty-reducing effects. Our approach, which this article applies mostly to Italy, the Low Countries and partially Germany and other areas, could be used for even broader international comparisons.
Subjects: 
Poverty
economic inequality
social inequality
wealthconcentration
Middle Ages
early modern period
Italy
Low Countries,Germany
plague
Black Death
JEL: 
D31
I12
I14
I30
N30
J11
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.