Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/251109
Authors: 
Cupák, Andrej
Ciaian, Pavel
Kancs, D'Artis
Year of Publication: 
2021
Series/Report no.: 
EERI Research Paper Series No. 05/2021
Publisher: 
Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels
Abstract: 
We estimate wage differentials and compare inequality trends between foreign-born and native-born workers across developed economies and developing economies. We leverage large internationally harmonised microdata covering 21 countries, 20 years and 1.5 million individuals and employ Blinder-Oaxaca counterfactual decomposition techniques. We find that vis-à-vis comparable workers born in developed countries, the workers born in developing economies are disadvantaged both in their home country labour markets and - if migrating - also in developed host countries. The estimated Blinder-Oaxaca wage differentials suggest the opposite for workers born in developed countries - their wages are higher not only in developed countries but for migrants also in developing host countries. After accounting for personal and job-related characteristics, at least 28% of the total native-to-migrant wage gap still remains unexplained. The unexplained wage gap has increased during the last decade and can be attributed to the labour market discrimination, differences in unobserved job characteristics, variation in unobserved skills, and the institutional labour market framework.
Subjects: 
labour market
wage gaps
immigrants
decomposition
JEL: 
D31
J15
J7
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.