Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/246493
Authors: 
Year of Publication: 
2021
Series/Report no.: 
UCD Centre for Economic Research Working Paper Series No. WP21/20
Publisher: 
University College Dublin, UCD School of Economics, Dublin
Abstract: 
The inability of central banks to attain their target inflation rates in recent years has raised questions about the extent to which central banks can control the inflation process. This paper discusses the evolution of thought and evidence since the 1960s on the determinants of inflation and the role that should be played by central banks. The paper highlights the roles played by two streams of thought associated with Milton Friedman: Monetarist theories predicting a key role for monetary aggregates in determining inflation and the rise in popularity of the expectationsaugmented Phillips curve. We discuss influence of the latter in determining the modern consensus on central bank institutions and the relative roles for fiscal and monetary policies. We conclude with a discussion of macroeconomic developments of the past decade and current policy options to stimulate the economy and restore inflation to its target levels, including the merits of "helicopter money".
Subjects: 
Inflation
central banks
Phillips curve
Milton Friedman
JEL: 
E31
E52
E58
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.05 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.