Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/243208
Authors: 
Fox, Marc
Stark, Oded
Year of Publication: 
1987
Series/Report no.: 
Harvard University Migration and Development Program Discussion Paper No. 33
Publisher: 
Harvard University, Center for Population Studies Cambridge, Massachusetts
Abstract: 
This paper assumes that migrants derive utility from their own consumption, their own leisure, and remittances to their family. It hypothesizes that the labor supply and remittances of Mexican migrants in the U.S. are jointly determined. Shits in real exchange rates affect the cost of sending a given real volume of remittances back to the family in the sending country. This in turn induces income and substitution effects on both remittances and labor supply. It is argued that the substitution effect would dominate. Therefore, under reasonable conditions, a real depreciation of the peso should lead to an increase in both remittances and labor supply. Empirical work using U.S. Census data and a data set containing information on Mexican migrants in the U.S. lends support to the theoretical predictions.
Subjects: 
Mexican migrants in the U.S.
Labor supply
Remittances
Exchange rate
JEL: 
D01
D11
D12
F22
F24
F31
F33
J22
J61
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.