Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/238337
Authors: 
Rhodes, Sybil
Bodenan, Mäeliss
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Serie Documentos de Trabajo No. 711
Abstract: 
In the context of restrictive immigration regimes and nationalist-populist politics, the international humanitarian obligation to consider migrants' claims for political asylum presents states with especially difficult challenges related to "vetting" and "monitoring" migrants. Given that these conditions are unlikely to end any time soon, some authors have suggested solutions to information asymmetries that might lead to effective and more humane outcomes to asylum and refugee crises. This paper evaluates one such proposal, the idea that migrants from "disfavored classes" be admitted in "circles of trust," groups of five or six people which could be held collectively responsible for the bad behavior of any individual member in the context of refugee and migrant policy in contemporary Argentina. Specifically, the paper compares a plan for Syrian refugees in place since 2015, and the reception of large numbers of Venezuelans since 2014. The paper concludes that "circles of trust" are fraught with perils, but that other non-traditional forms of vetting and monitoring might sometimes be humane and useful in particular situations.
Subjects: 
Refugees
migrants
vetting
policy
monitoring
Argentina
circles of trust
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
593.46 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.