Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/238325
Authors: 
Gatskova, Kseniia
Ivlevs, Artjoms
Dietz, Barbara
Year of Publication: 
2019
Citation: 
[Journal:] Feminist Economics [ISSN:] 1354-5701 [Volume:] 25 [Year:] 2019 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 96-118
Abstract: 
This study examines how large-scale, predominantly male emigration affects the education of girls staying in Tajikistan, the poorest post-Soviet state and one of the most remittance-dependent economies in the world. Using data from a three-wave household panel survey conducted in 2007, 2009, and 2011, this study finds that the net effect of migration on girls’ schooling turns from positive to negative with girls’ age. These results lend support to various conceptual channels through which the emigration of household members may affect girls’ education, including the relaxation of budget constraints, a change of the household head, and an increase in household work. At the practical level, the results imply that migration can be detrimental to women’s empowerment and cast doubt on whether emigration is an appropriate long-term development strategy for Tajikistan.
Subjects: 
girls' education
migration
remittances
female empowerment
Tajikistan
JEL: 
F22
J16
J24
Published Version’s DOI: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Document Version: 
Accepted Manuscript (Postprint)

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.