Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/237583
Year of Publication: 
2021
Series/Report no.: 
UCD Centre for Economic Research Working Paper Series No. WP21/05
Publisher: 
University College Dublin, UCD Centre for Economic Research, Dublin
Abstract: 
The potential impact of COVID-19 restrictions on worker well-being is currently unknown. In this study we examine 15 well-being outcomes collected from 621 full-time workers assessed before (November, 2019 - February, 2020) and during (May-June, 2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. Fixed effects analyses are used to investigate how the COVID-19 restrictions and involuntary homeworking affect well-being and job performance. The majority of worker wellbeing measures are not adversely affected. Homeworkers feel more engaged and autonomous, experience fewer negative emotions and feel more connected to their organisations. However, these improvements come at the expense of reduced homelife satisfaction and job performance.
Subjects: 
COVID-19 restrictions
workers
homeworking
subjective well-being
productivity
mental health
job satisfaction
engagement
JEL: 
J08
J24
I31
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.45 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.