Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/237058
Authors: 
Muckenhuber, Mattias
Rehm, Miriam
Schnetzer, Matthias
Year of Publication: 
2021
Series/Report no.: 
ifso working paper No. 15
Publisher: 
University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute for Socio-Economics (ifso), Duisburg
Abstract: 
We investigate how previous generations of migrants and their children integrated into Austrian society, as measured by their wealth ownership. Using data from the Household Finance and Consumption Survey (HFCS), we document a positive average migrant wealth gap between migrant and native households. However, the raw gap is almost negligible for second generation migrant households, whereas it rises across the unconditional net wealth distribution for first generation migrant households and peaks at more than e140,000 around the 75th percentile. Decomposing the partial effects of a set of covariates using RIF regressions suggests that the lack of inheritances and the presence of children have the highest explanatory power for the migrant wealth gap of first generation migrant household. For second generation migrant households, inheritances have the highest impact, but they contribute negatively towards the explanation of the migrant wealth gap. In general, the covariates in our analysis can explain only a small part of the migrant wealth gap. Given the similarity of native and second generation migrant households, we cannot reject the hypothesis that migrants in the past integrated into Austrian society by acquiring comparable wealth levels.
Subjects: 
Migration
Wealth Distribution
Wealth Gap
Unconditional Quantile Regression
JEL: 
C31
D31
F22
G51
J15
J61
Creative Commons License: 
cc-by Logo
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
617.17 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.