Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/234666
Authors: 
Vera Cossio, Diego Alejandro
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series No. IDB-WP-01064
Abstract: 
Decreases in labor supply among cash-transfer recipients are often cited as potential drawbacks of social-assistance programs. However, cash transfers can also increase employment. Using variation across cohorts and over time in the eligibility criteria of a nationwide conditional cash-transfer program in Bolivian public schools, this paper shows that employment increases among parents of eligible children, particularly for females. The increase in employment coincides with increases in self-employment and in the probability of investing in family businesses. These effects are mostly driven by females from areas with limited access to financial services. As mothers work more, overworked fathers reduce work hours. The results suggest that there are (positive) unintended consequences of cash-transfer programs targeting households with school-age children: Cash transfers may relax liquidity constraints and boost entrepreneurship, and also relieve overworked adults.
Subjects: 
Cash transfers
Labor Supply
Gender
Entrepreneurship
JEL: 
D13
J46
J21
J22
O12
O18
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/legalcode
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.