Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/232502
Authors: 
Garcia-Brazales, Javier
Year of Publication: 
2021
Abstract: 
Identity norms are an important cause of inequalities and talent misallocation. I lever- age a unique opportunity to observe students exogenously allocated to classes across a close-to-nationally-representative set of Vietnamese schools to show that more exposure to female peers during childhood causally decreases the extent of agreement with tradi- tional gender roles in the long-run. This shift in attitudes is accompanied by changes in actual behavior: employing friendship nominations I find that male children have more female friends and spend more time with them outside school. Moreover, both their intensive and extensive margin contributions to home production increase in the short- and the long-run. These results are novel in the attitudes formation and in the long- term effects of peers literature and are important in informing optimal class allocation. Academic spillovers from female classmates are much weaker.
Subjects: 
Long-term Peer Effects
Gender Roles
Attitudes Formation
JEL: 
I24
I25
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
2.83 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.