Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/232271
Authors: 
Egger, Dennis
Miguel, Edward
Warren, Shana S.
Shenoy, Ashish
Collins, Elliott
Karlan, Dean
Parkerson, Doug
Mobarak, A. Mushfiq
Fink, Günther
Udry, Christopher
Walker, Michael
Haushofer, Johannes
Larreboure, Magdalena
Athey, Susan
Lopez-Pena, Paula
Benhachmi, Salim
Humphreys, Macartan
Lowe, Layna
Meriggi, Niccoló F.
Wabwire, Andrew
Davis, C. Austin
Pape, Utz Johann
Graff, Tilman
Voors, Maarten
Nekesa, Carolyn
Vernot, Corey
Year of Publication: 
2021
Citation: 
[Journal:] Science Advances [ISSN:] 2375-2548 [Publisher:] American Association for the Advancement of Science [Place:] Washington, DC [Volume:] 7 [Year:] 2021 [Issue:] 6 (Article No.:) eabe0997
Abstract: 
Despite numerous journalistic accounts, systematic quantitative evidence on economic conditions during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic remains scarce for most low- and middle-income countries, partly due to limitations of official economic statistics in environments with large informal sectors and subsistence agriculture. We assemble evidence from over 30,000 respondents in 16 original household surveys from nine countries in Africa (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Rwanda, Sierra Leone), Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Philippines), and Latin America (Colombia). We document declines in employment and income in all settings beginning March 2020. The share of households experiencing an income drop ranges from 8 to 87% (median, 68%). Household coping strategies and government assistance were insufficient to sustain precrisis living standards, resulting in widespread food insecurity and dire economic conditions even 3 months into the crisis. We discuss promising policy responses and speculate about the risk of persistent adverse effects, especially among children and other vulnerable groups.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Document Version: 
Published Version

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.