Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/230153
Authors: 
Schilling, Michael
Becker, Nicolas
Grabenhorst, Magdalena M.
König, Cornelius J.
Year of Publication: 
2020
Citation: 
[Journal:] International Journal of Selection and Assessment [ISSN:] 1468-2389 [Volume:] [Issue:] [Pages:] n/a-n/a
Abstract: 
Several faking theories have identified applicants’ cognitive ability (CA) as a determinant of faking—the intentional distortion of answers by candidates—but the corresponding empirical findings in the area of personality tests are often ambiguous. Following the assumption that CA is important for faking, we expected applicants with high CA to show higher personality scores in selection situations, leading in this case to significant correlations between CA and personality scores, but not in nonselection situations. This meta‐analysis (66 studies, k = 115 individual samples, N = 46,265) showed this pattern of results as well as moderation effects for the study design (laboratory vs. field), the response format of the personality test, and the type of CA test.
Subjects: 
Big Five
cognitive ability
faking
meta‐analysis
personality
personnel selection
self‐presentation
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Document Version: 
Published Version

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.