Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/228323
Authors: 
Ahrens, Leo
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
LIS Working Paper Series No. 771
Abstract: 
Income inequality is rising but there seems to be no clear-cut effect on redistribution preferences, which is inconsistent with expectations of individual utility maximization. To explain this puzzle, recent research focuses on other-regarding motives. This study follows prior theorization presuming that the effect of inequality is transmitted through normative value judgements, but argues that a central point has been neglected. Individuals support a certain level of inequality caused by differences in individual merit and it is primarily non-merit based inequality that affects redistribution preferences. This view is substantiated by assessing the effect of an inequality measure that aims to solely measure non-merit based inequality. Multilevel models using repeated cross-sections show that it can explain both within- and between-country variance in redistribution preferences and that it is a better predictor than previously used measures. This suggests that the socio-political consequences of inequality cannot be inferred directly from the level of inequality.
Subjects: 
Redistribution
inequality
fairness
legitimacy
preferences
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.